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Station Announcements from subway, light rail and bus systems: Please choose a category!

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Please choose from the following means of transportations:

- Amsterdam (NL)
- Atlanta (USA)
- Berlin (DE)
- Hamburg (DE)
- London (GB)







Germany:
- Bielefeld
- Bonn
- Bremen
- Cologne
- Duisburg
- Düsseldorf
- Essen
- Hanover
- Karlsruhe
- Krefeld
- Mülheim (Ruhr)
England:
- Birmingham
- Croydon (London)
- DLR (London)
- Manchester
- Nottingham
- Sheffield





- Bremerhaven (DE)
- Oldenburg (DE)
- Osnabrück (DE)

Subway
Light Rail
Buses
Subway (or Underground) systems are common in big cities. When there's no space on the surface, the ground below the street is the only answer to provide rapid transit systems. However, under-ground running is not a requirement for a subway system - it has to be grade separated, run trains frequently (at least every 10 minutes) and (usually) uses 3rd rail technology to allow for smaller tunnel diameters to be used. Since subways are found everywhere on the globe, this section has announcements from different countries.
Buses are the most frequent type of public transportation, and mostly the only way to get places in smaller towns, cities and rural areas. Buses can use normal roads and do not need extensive private right of ways (paid for by the operator). This cost-effective way of running buses allows the flexibility needed for serving areas with a lower density of population.
Obviously, I cannot present announcements from every bus system I've used, so I picked three systems in northwest Germany as a sample of bus announcements.
"Light rail" is a modern term for anything from conventional streetcar/tram systems to systems that use mostly subway infrastructure but smaller and less heavy vehicles, hence the term "light rail". In Germany, light rail gradually evolved when the conventional streetcar systems were upgraded with private right of ways, underground sections and bigger, faster and more comfortable vehicles. Germans do not use "light rail" to decribe these systems but call them "City Railway" ("Stadtbahn") instead. The English systems represented on this website are entirely new systems, opened in the 1980s and 1990s after most cities had been 40-50 years without any rail-based local transit systems.

Notice:

The recordings on this site are meant to demonstrate how each individual transit company uses their announcements. All recordings were made by me in regularly scheduled services. Commercial use and publication of the recordinds is not permitted.

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(c) Kai Brackschulze 2008